U.S. Army War College Senior Service Fellowship Program

U.S. Army War College Senior Service Fellowship Program

Each year the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution hosts U.S. Army War College Fellows who have been selected for a Senior Service Fellowship. Fellows pursue educative opportunities at S-CAR to enhance and expand their advisory capabilities in various communities they support.

Fellows in residence at S-CAR attend classes, lectures, workshops, and conferences; engage in research on contemporary conflicts; and may participate in any of the centers, working groups, and certificate programs offered at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution.

Learn more about current and past U.S. Army War College Fellows in the bios below.

For more information about the U.S. Army War College and the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, please visit their respective homepages by clicking one of the links below.

School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

U.S. Army War College

Current Fellows

The 2013-2014 U.S. Army War College Senior Service Fellows at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University are:


Lieutenant Colonel Bradford J. Davis

Lieutenant Colonel Brad Davis received a commission from the ROTC program at the University of Pittsburgh upon his graduation from Carnegie Mellon University with a B.S. in Civil Engineering. He completed the Signal Officers Basic Course at Fort Gordon, Georgia and served as a platoon leader in the 307th Signal Battalion at Camp Carroll, Korea. He has also served as a company executive officer and battalion Logistics Officer in 72nd Signal Battalion and as brigade training officer in the 7th Signal Brigade in Mannheim, Germany. He returned to Korea after completing the Signal Officer Advance Course in order to serve as the 1st Signal Brigade exercise officer and commander Bravo Company, 304th Signal Battalion.

Following his company command service, Lieutenant Colonel Davis graduated from the Defense Language Institute at the Presidio of Monterey with honors in Mandarin Chinese and joined the Defense Attaché Office at the U.S. Embassy in Singapore for in-country training. In 2005 he returned to Germany for three years in order to serve as the exercise officer for 5th Signal Command and Operations Officer/Executive Officer for the 69th Signal Battalion in Wuerzburg and Grafenwoehr.

Lieutenant Colonel Davis served as an operational analyst for Joint Forces Command's Joint Center for Operational Analysis at the Joint Warfighting Center in Suffolk, Virginia and is a Joint Staff College graduate. He commanded 30th Signal Battalion at Wheeler Army Airfield in Hawaii from June 3, 2011 through June 7, 2013. He holds an M.A. in National Security Studies with a focus in Asian Studies and currently serves as an Army War College Fellow at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.


 Colonel Guy M. Jones

Colonel Guy M. Jones was commissioned from Texas A&M University as an Infantry Officer in May, 1994.  He holds a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering, a Masters degree in Military Arts and Science, and is a graduate of the U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies.

Colonel Jones has served as Rifle Platoon Leader, Support Platoon Leader, and Battalion Logistics Officer for 2nd Battalion, 187 Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); Aide-de-Camp for the Assistant Division Commander (Operations), 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); Battalion Adjutant and Assistant Operations Officer, 1st Battalion, 503 Infantry Regiment, Camp Casey, Korea; Assistant Operations Officer, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Camp Hovey, Korea; Regimental Training Officer, Alpha Company and Headquarters Company Commander, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment; 82nd Airborne Division Secretary to the General Staff;  82nd Airborne Division Chief of Plans and CJTF-82 Deputy Combined Strategic Plans Officer; Operations Officer for 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment; Operations Officer for the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He served for three years as commander of 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment at Fort Bragg, which included two combat deployments to Afghanistan.

Colonel Jones completed his command service and began serving on the Department of the Army Staff within the Operations, Plans, and Force Development directorate. He is currently serving as an Army War College Fellow at George Mason University.  

Past Fellows

 Colonel J. Craig Combs 

J. Craig Combs is an Army National Guard Chaplain (Colonel) and U.S. Army War College Fellow at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. He was deployed to Iraq in 2004-2005 as the Battalion Chaplain for the 2-142nd Infantry, 36th Infantry Division and again in 2010-2011 as the Division Chaplain for the 36th Infantry Division, Texas Army National Guard. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Dallas Baptist University (1976), a Master of Theology degree from Dallas Theological Seminary (1981), and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Texas Tech University (1996). Before his acceptance as a War College Fellow, he served as the full-time Operations Chaplain for the Texas National Guard and the Joint Force Headquarters Chaplain for the Texas Military Forces. Previous to serving in full-time status with the military, he was a traditional National Guard Chaplain while serving in his civilian life as a Christian educator and ordained minister. His wife, Marcylle, is president and CFO of a Home Health and Hospice company. He has four sons, three daughters-in-law, one daughter, and three grandchildren. All of his sons have completed Bachelor’s degrees, from four different Texas Universities, and one also just completed a Masters degree in Theological Studies from Truett Theological Seminary. His daughter is a sophomore at Texas Christian University pursuing a degree in early childhood education. 


 Chaplain Marc Gauthier

Marc Gauthier is an Army Chaplain and Army Senior Service College Fellow at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. He recently returned from a one year assignment in Kabul Afghanistan as Chaplain to the International Security Assistance Force Joint Command. He holds a Master of Divinity Degree and A Doctor of Ministry Degree in Biblical Communications from Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary. His previous assignments include the Command Chaplain for the Army Special Forces Command and the Course Manager for the Army Chaplain Officer Basic Course. He has served as an Active Duty Army Chaplain for 19 years and is an ordained minister with the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference. He is conducting research on the applications of microfinance and microenterprise as tools to foster peacebuilding and conflict transformation in post conflict environments.  


Chaplain Peter Lawson

Peter Lawson is an Army National Guard Chaplain and Army Senior Service College Fellow at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. He was deployed to Ramadi Iraq in 2005-2006 as the Brigade Combat Team Chaplain for the 228th Pennsylvania Army National Guard Combat Team. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Westminster College, Pennsylvania (1982), a Master of Divinity Degree from Princeton Theological Seminary (1985) and A Doctor of Ministry Degree from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary (2002). Before his acceptance into the Senior Service College, he served as the Deputy Staff Chaplain at the National Guard Bureau in Arlington VA. Previous to serving in full-time status with the military, he was a part-time reservist and full-time civilian pastor, having served three church pastorates in Ohio and Pennsylvania. He is an ordained Minister of Word and Sacrament in the Presbyterian Church USA. The focus of his research is on the role of religious rhetoric in National Security Strategy since 9/11.


Chaplain Terry L. McBride

Chaplain Terry L. McBride holds a Master of Divinity Degree from the Liberty Theological Seminary in Lynchburg, Virginia. An ordained Baptist minister, he has pastored churches in North Carolina, and Virginia.  In May 1988, he became a United States Army Chaplain Candidate. Upon graduation from Seminary in 1990, he was commissioned a United States Army Chaplain and was assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

He has served in various assignments all over the globe and served as a Battalion Chaplain in combat operations in support of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm; in peacekeeping operations in Bosnia in support of Operation Joint Endeavor; three combat tours as the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Arabian Peninsula Chaplain, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; currently attending the U.S. Army War College Senior Service College Fellowship at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia.


Chaplain James Palmer

Lieutenant Colonel James Palmer, Jr. is a career Army Chaplain currently serving as an Army Fellow at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia. He is a graduate of the Chaplain’s Officer Basic and Advanced Courses; Combined Arms Services and Staff School, Force Management Course; and Command and General Staff College.

Chaplain Palmer’s previous assignments include: Chaplain for the 115th Forward Support Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division; 304th Signal Battalion, 11th Transportation Battalion and Post Chaplain Fort Story, Virginia; Division Support Command (DISCOM), and 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division; Deputy Task Force Chaplain for rotation KFOR 3A Joint Guardian Kosovo; Ethics Instructor for the Army Logistics University (ALU); Small Group Instructor for the Chaplain Officer Basic Leaders Course at the U.S. Army Chaplain Center and School; the latest was Headquarters Training and Doctrine Command.

James holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Virginia Union University, a Master of Divinity from the Samuel Dewitt Proctor School of Theology, Virginia Union University, a Master of Arts in American Studies from the College of William and Mary and the Doctor of Ministry from Regent University.  Chaplain Palmer’s research interest focused on “The Influence of Religion on the Rules of Engagements.” 


Chaplain Charles Reynolds

Chaplain Charles Reynolds holds a Master of Divinity, and Doctor of Ministry Degrees from the Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary in Mill Valley, CA. His Doctor of Ministry Research Project “World Changers” has been replicated nationally and internationally by Southern Baptist for the past twenty years. He also has a Master of Theology Degree in Religion and Culture from Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton NJ. He has served in various assignments including a deployment to Macedonia with Operation Able Century as Battalion Chaplain in 1998, and three tours as Battalion Chaplain in support of peacekeeping operations in Bosnia with Operation Joint Endeavor in 1997, 1999 and 2000. In 2004 he received the Officer Instructor of the Year Award at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, where he taught Cross Cultural Awareness to US Special Operations Forces. He has served two combat tours the first with the Third Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from February 2006 till June 2007. He is currently serving as the Deputy Command Chaplain for United States Forces Iraq with an additional assignment as the Strategic Religious Advisor for the Commanding General Lloyd J. Austin in support of Operation New Dawn Iraq. As the Strategic Advisement Chaplain he conducted over 40 meeting engagements seeking to resolve conflicts between various religious factions.

He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; and the U.S. Army War College Senior Service College where he served as a “Fellow” at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia.  His research project was on the Danger of Avoiding and the importance of Including Religious Issues in Strategic Military Policy and Planning.  


Chaplain Ira Houck

Chaplain (LTC) Ira C. Houck III holds Bachelor of Arts from the University of South Carolina, Master of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary; Master of Theology from Princeton Theological Seminary and a Master Certificate in Conflict Resolution from George Mason University’s Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. He was ordained December 17, 1980 in the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He earned a Doctor of Ministry degree from the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1991. He became an U.S. Army chaplain in (’89) and after Desert Storm he migrated to active duty (’92).

Chaplain Houck served as Small Group Instructor of World Religions for Chaplains at the US Army Chaplain Center and School, and as Chief of Doctrine and Futures at the Chaplain School’s Combat Developments (’03-06). He was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan for a special tasking (’06) in support of Detainee Operations for the Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC). He has written classified information papers for specialized areas of military chaplaincy; religious support to Detainees, religious support in Homeland Defense and Katrina disaster relief, and religious support with Information Operations. Chaplain Houck is an honorary recipient of the National Bible Society’s Witherspoon Award presented in New York City at the St. Regis Hotel, NYC (’07). He earned the US Army Air Assault and Airborne parachute badges to ensure the free exercise of religion with those elite forces.

The Army Chief of Chaplains selected him for the U.S. Army War College Senior Service Fellowship Program (’08) at George Mason University’s Institute of Conflict Analysis and Resolution in Arlington, Virginia. The US Army War College published his thesis, “Strategic Religious Engagement for Peacebuilding” (’09). Upon graduation from ICAR he was assigned as III Corps’ World Religions Chaplain and provided direct religious support to the survivors of the Fort Hood Massacre on 5 NOV 09, then deployed with the Corps Chaplains to Iraq (’10) with duty at the US Embassy, Baghdad, as the United States Forces, Iraq, Staff Religious Advisor to Generals Odierno and Austin. Upon his return from Iraq (’11), he was assigned and currently serves as the Director, Center for World Religions at the US Army Chaplain Center and School in Columbia, SC
 

Chaplain Kenneth Duvall 

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